Tag carnival

Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival Issue #11

Welcome to the Issue #10 of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. For those of you not familiar with what a Blog Carnival is, here is a short description: a collection of links pointing to blog posts around a specific topic. As you may have guessed it, this blog carnival will be centered around the subject of fiction writing, with a special interest for fantasy and science fiction.

Previous issues: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10

Enjoy!

 

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsShanah Haislip presents 5 Things Rocky Taught Me About Writing Knockout Main Characters posted at Positive Writer, saying, “The Rocky movies achieved lasting popularity as a result of the hugely effective group of main characters. Here are five tips about characterization I learned while watching.”


fiction writing tipsEM Castellan presents Writing a large cast of characters – with Black Sails posted at EM Castellan, saying, “Fantasy and Historical novels have something in common: they often have a large ensemble cast of at least a dozen main characters, with up to hundreds of secondary characters. Writing a large cast of characters presents some specific challenges: how can the writer make sure each character is distinct from the others and fully realized?”


fiction writing tipsAva Jae presents How to Write a Great Antagonist posted at Writability, saying, “So while working on my last couple manuscripts, I’ve been thinking a lot about antagonists. Specifically, on antagonists that I really actually love.”


fiction writing tipsLisa Alber presents The Art of Creating Memorable Villains Whatever Your Genre posted at Writer Unboxed, saying, “I write crime fiction, so I’m fascinated by villains in all their diversity. However, I notice that when we talk about ‘villains,’ we tend to think only in terms of genre fiction such as mystery, suspense, and thriller.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsStephanie Morrill presents Editing in Layers: Drawing out Emotion and Tension posted at Go Teen Writers, saying, “One of the reasons editing in layers is such a valuable practice is that it forces your brain to focus on a particular element of each scene. If you read your scene looking just for adverbs, for example, you’ll have a much easier time spotting them than if you’re looking for adverbs, sensory details, and the level of tension.”


fiction writing tipsCate Baum presents Ten things to do to win a writing contest posted at Self-Publishing Review, saying, “With so many entries to judge, what is it about your book that will win you a prize? Cate Baum, co-founder of the SPR Awards spills the beans on the best tips to get that award.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsJanice Hardy presents A Quick Tip for Adding Conflict and Tension to Your Scenes posted at Janice Hardy’s Fiction University, saying, “Agent Donald Maas once said, “You can never have too much conflict.” He’s not alone in this thinking, and “not enough conflict” is a common reason manuscripts get rejected. Even novels with strong plots and solid core conflicts can earn a, “sorry, not for me,” because the conflict comes in dribs and drabs and there’s no tension on every page or in every scene.”


fiction writing tipsMelissa Donovan presents Mysterious and Thrilling Fiction Writing Prompts posted at Writing Forward, saying, “Sometimes it’s hard to start a new writing project. Maybe you’re overwhelmed by too many ideas and can’t decide which one to tackle. Or maybe you’re searching for the right idea, something to spark your imagination and inspire your next story.”


fiction writing tipsEmily Wenstrom presents 3 Times You Should STOP Writing posted at The Write Practice, saying, “Write every day. Set a word count and don’t get up until you reach it. Butt in chair, hands on keyboard. Writers get a lot of advice about the importance of pushing ourselves to get the words on the page. It’s a principle I try to live by, and I know I’m not alone. But there are times when the best thing you can do for your writing is to… stop writing.”


fiction writing tipsJody Hedlund presents The Importance of Throwing Our Readers for a Loop posted at Jody Hedlund, saying, “I think I’m one of those people built with an internal ‘surprise radar.’ I can sense a surprise coming, spot the clues, and figure out what’s going on without my family realizing I’ve discovered the ‘big surprise.'”


Fiction Writing Tips Blog CarnivalThis concludes this edition of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. I want to thank all the contributors and invite them to submit more in the future.

If you enjoyed these articles, please leave some comments on the authors’ blogs and on this blog.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival, to be published on January 31, 2014 using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

read more

Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival Issue #9

Welcome to the Issue #9 of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. For those of you not familiar with what a Blog Carnival is, here is a short description: a collection of links pointing to blog posts around a specific topic. As you may have guessed it, this blog carnival will be centered around the subject of fiction writing, with a special interest for fantasy and science fiction.

Previous issues: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8

Enjoy!

 

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsChrys Fey presents How To Write A Short Story posted at Write With Fey, saying, “Writing a short story is just like writing a novel. You will need an idea that you can lay on a page to blaze into a story. When you get an idea you are halfway there.”


fiction writing tipsArt Holcomb presents Improving Your Fiction: The Relationship Chart posted at StoryFix, saying, “Relationships are at the heart of all great stories. They bond the reader to the work by giving them someone to root for (or against). They are the foundation of the subplots which broaden and deepen our novels and films. And they supply the emotional reactions that propel the plot forward.”


fiction writing tipsVictoria Grefer presents How much description is too much? Too little? posted at Crimson League, saying, “Authors: when plotting (whether by outlining or while writing) and when editing for content, have you found that one of the most difficult, most painful requirements is cutting out ideas, descriptions, and scenes that you personally love but just don’t contribute to the overall plot?”


fiction writing tipsMonica M. Clark presents How a Scene List Can Change Your Novel-Writing Life posted at The Write Practice, saying, “By the end of this post you will have a nagging urge to use an excel spreadsheet. Don’t make that face—I know you’re a writer and not a data analyst. Or if you are a data analyst—I get that you’re on this blog to get away from your day job. But guess what? At the suggestion of Randy Ingermason—the creator of the Snowflake Method—I listed all of the scenes in my novel in a nice little Google spreadsheet. It changed my novel-writing life, and doing the same will change yours too.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsKsenia Anske presents STARTING AND ENDING CHAPTERS, OR WHERE THE HELL AM I SUPPOSED TO CUT IT? posted at Ksenia Anske, saying, “Whereas I have sort of adopted the guideline on the opening of the novel being the summary of the whole novel, going as far as trying my opening sentence to be the summary of the whole novel, in chapters I sort of summarize the whole chapter in the first paragraph. I try to give enough of the space and time and who does what to sketch out what’s about to happen, like, setting a stage, then for the rest of the chapter I simply expand on it.”


fiction writing tipsBrian DeLeonard presents Using Villains to Shape Your Hero posted at Mythic Scribes, saying, “In a previous article some time ago, I wrote about developing a character named Breldin, and how I created his home setting, the town of Trindall Grove, based on the way I wanted to shape his personality over the life that he’s lived.”


fiction writing tipsJessica Schmeidler presents How to Achieve Coherence in Writing posted at The Write Shadow, saying, “Are you a sequential thinker? Many of us think we are, but when we take a closer look, it becomes apparent that we’re a bit more spatial than we’ve given ourselves credit for. While this may not seem like a very important bit of information to know about ourselves, it can actually come in quite handy when we’re writing.”


fiction writing tipsJohn Hansen presents Writing An Antagonist posted at Teens Can Write, Too!, saying, “There’s something about antagonists that, I think, inherently fascinates us as readers. We all get at least a little curious about what leads someone to become “evil,” why it is they do what they do, and so on.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsAnne R. Allen presents Are Your Family and Friends Sabotaging your Writing Dreams? posted at Anne R. Allen’s Blog, saying, “Writers participating in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) may discover that friends and family aren’t entirely enthused by your decision to disappear into your computer for a month. (I have a secret suspicion that Chris Baty invented NaNo in order to escape those painful family Thanksgiving dinners.)”


fiction writing tipsKimberley Grabas presents To Blog Or Not To Blog: Is It Really Necessary? posted at Your Writer Platform, saying, ““There are millions of blogs out there. What’s the point of adding another to the mix? What are the chances that my blog will stand out from the hordes of others competing for the limited attention of readers?” Sound familiar? Many writers feel this way, but is it a sound argument? Go ahead and change “blog” to “book” and re-read the above three sentences. Uh-oh. See what happened there? You’ve just argued yourself out of a career in writing. 😉 So, let’s assume that if you feel your book has a chance of standing out, despite all those that came before, then so does your blog. But the bigger question that I think writers are really asking is this: will the results I receive from a blog be worth the time I put into it?”


fiction writing tipsAva Jae presents How Important is Word Count posted at Writability, saying, “While I don’t think it’s something you need to stress over while first drafting—you can always refine during your revisions—after the first draft, you may want to take a good, hard look at your word count and make sure it’s within what’s expected for your genre and category. Particularly if you’re pursuing traditional publishing.”


fiction writing tipsHeather Webb presents When Writing Sucks and You Want to Quit posted at The Debutante Ball, saying, “You’re in a deep funk and can’t get out of it. Writing is HARD and it’s getting the best of you. Publishing is even HARDER and it makes you want to cry. The words aren’t flowing, life is a big ball of stress and distraction, and you just don’t know if you have it in you. What do you do?”


Fiction Writing Tips Blog CarnivalThis concludes this edition of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. I want to thank all the contributors and invite them to submit more in the future.

If you enjoyed these articles, please leave some comments on the authors’ blogs and on this blog.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival, to be published on January 31, 2014 using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

read more

Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival Issue #8

Welcome to the Issue #8 of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. For those of you not familiar with what a Blog Carnival is, here is a short description: a collection of links pointing to blog posts around a specific topic. As you may have guessed it, this blog carnival will be centered around the subject of fiction writing, with a special interest for fantasy and science fiction.

Previous issues: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7

Enjoy!

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsJeanNicole Rivers presents Elements of a Character Study posted at JeanNicole Rivers, saying, “Character is all about fear, tragedy and outcome. We have all heard the quote, ‘It is not your beliefs that make you a good person, but your actions.’ and from thinking like this we derive that it is what you do, especially in times of adversity that forge ones character.”


fiction writing tipsChrys Fey presents How To Create Mystery posted at Write With Fey, saying, “Mystery is not just a genre but an emotion that can be used in any story. Here are TEN TIPS to help you create mystery in your story.”


fiction writing tipsMarjorie Reynolds presents Making Your Characters Extreme posted at Story Fix, saying, “If you want to write a novel that readers will remember decades or even centuries later, learn from the masters and populate it with one or more extreme characters. You’ll find they’ll not only linger in a reader’s mind, but they’ll give your story energy and heighten your own interest in writing it.”


fiction writing tipsVictoria Grefer presents 5 Ways to Share a Point of View That Contrasts With Your Protagonist’s posted at Crimson League, saying, “How important is it, when writing, to provide multiple points of view and multiple sides of the story? This is something all authors ask themselves, and it’s an important question without a clear cut answer.”


fiction writing tipsDebra Elramey presents What Do You Do When Your Muse Is On Vacation? posted at The Write Practice, saying, “I asked a friend yesterday if she mainly wrote out of inspiration, or if she’d mastered the discipline of sitzfleisch. She was quick to say, “I write when I’m inspired.””


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsA. Howitt presents How to Write Love Scenes posted at Mythic Scribes, saying, “As fantasy writers, we accept that certain elements are expected in our novels. For example, the fight scene. Whether it’s an epic battle or a street duel, there’s going to be a fight somewhere. But what about love?”


fiction writing tipsRobin Storey presents Writers’ research – the methods we use to get it right posted at Robin Storey, saying, “Author Robin Storey looks at the different methods of research used by writers to ensure the authenticity of their novels.”


fiction writing tipsAndre Cruz presents 5 Creative Writing Prompts to Break Your Writer’s Block posted at The Word, saying, “I have found that when I am experiencing writer’s block, the best method to break it is using creative writing prompts. For those of you that do not know, creative writing prompts can be a word or phrase that a writer puts down on paper to get them thinking about a story idea by simply trying to create a story from that word or phrase.”


fiction writing tipsRandy Ross presents Top Secret Work Habits of the Successful Novelist posted at The Loneliest Planet by Randy Ross, saying, “Recently, I’ve been working on my novel at the local library, where I don’t have Web access to distract me. Last week, a successful novelist* started coming in to work on what I’m assuming is his next book. So, I’ve had the good fortune to observe his routine, which I’d like to share.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsJo Linsdell presents Advice for Writers posted at Writers and Authors, saying, “When I immerse myself in my writing– attend a writing group, and practice with short works or exercises– an amazing thing happens. My writing gets better. How can I tell? I edit less, the tone stays consistent, and I can feel emotion in what I wrote. As with any activity, practice makes perfect.”


fiction writing tipsLovelyn Bettison presents Interview with author A.D. Koboah posted at Comments for H. Lovelyn Bettison, saying, “This is an interview with self-published author A.D. Koboah. In it she talks about the inspiration for her novel Peace and why she is attracted to writing about dark subject matter.”


fiction writing tipsKimberley Grabas presents 2 Must-Dos to Make Your Book Marketing Infinitely Easier posted at Your Writer Platform, saying, “Why is it that your book marketing is falling short? You’re trying to implement as many of the tricks and tips that the ‘experts’ recommend, but few of your marketing tactics are gaining traction. Sure, you haven’t tried EVERYTHING yet, but you’ve tried enough to move the needle at least a smidge, right? There’s no question that building a strong platform takes time, and gaining momentum–even with a sound marketing plan–requires the patience of a saint. But something just isn’t jiving.”


Fiction Writing Tips Blog CarnivalThis concludes this edition of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. I want to thank all the contributors and invite them to submit more in the future.

If you enjoyed these articles, please leave some comments on the authors’ blogs and on this blog.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival, to be published on December 31, 2013 using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

read more

Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival Issue #7

Welcome to the Issue #7 of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. For those of you not familiar with what a Blog Carnival is, here is a short description: a collection of links pointing to blog posts around a specific topic. As you may have guessed it, this blog carnival will be centered around the subject of fiction writing, with a special interest for fantasy and science fiction.

Previous issues: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6

Enjoy!

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsChrys Fey presents How To Build Suspense posted at Write With Fey, saying, “Suspense makes your reader’s heart pound uncontrollably, their hands sweat around your book, and drives them to read faster so they can turn the page to find out what is going to happen next. Here are ten tips to help you build suspense.”


fiction writing tipsAva Jae presents How to Write Emotion Effectively posted at Writability, saying, “[…]showing emotion is sometimes a little easier said than done. Where do you even begin? If you’re having trouble, it may help to use these four steps.”


fiction writing tipsRoz Morris presents Dialogue special part 2: dialogue is more than talking posted at Nail Your Novel, saying, “Dialogue is action. Dialogue is a kind of action scene. Although the conversation is the main focus, the characters are more than just mouths.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsBryan Chau presents Putting The M.C. Hammer On Grammar posted at Success Pen Pal, saying, “grammar, writing, speaking, success, etc.”


fiction writing tipsRinelle Grey presents 7 Tips to Help you Write More posted at Rinelle Grey, saying, “So frequent releases have a lot of advantages, BUT, only if you’re writing is good. So the question is, how can you increase your writing output, without sacrificing quality? Here are some of my tips.”


fiction writing tipsJody Hedlund presents Plotting: How to Know Which Scenes to Include in Your Book posted at Jody Hedlund, saying, “While I don’t believe there’s a hard, fast rule or formula for which scenes to write out in detail and which ones to summarize, I think there are a few principles we can keep in mind when choosing scenes to include in our books.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsJon presents The Perfect Way To Fail posted at COMFORT PIT, saying, “An in-depth article on perfectionism, failure and creative expectations in writing and art. The post combines examples from the scientific literature with real case studies of well known artists. I think this is a must read for anyone serious about tackling the creative lifestyle.”


fiction writing tipsSamir Bharadwaj presents Fighting the Procrastination of Significant Moments posted at Samir Bharadwaj dot Com, saying, “We wait for the right moment, the right date, the right time, the right amount of experience, all procrastinating against doing things now. Fight the impulse.”


Bonus Round For NaNoWriMo

fiction writing tipsKristen Lamb presents How to Make Sure Your NaNo Project Isn’t a Hot Mess posted at Kristen Lamb’s Blog, saying, “I LOVE NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month, which is November). It is a fantastic way to push ourselves and also for new writers to be introduced to a professional pace and a professional attitude. When we do this “writing thing” for a living, we have to write no matter what.”


fiction writing tipsChuck Wendig presents WELCOME TO NANOWRIMO PREP SCHOOL, WORD-NERDS posted at Terribleminds, saying, “If you are not yet putting words down daily, you need to flex them penmonkey muscles, so that, come November, you can pop open your word processor and say, “TWO TICKETS TO THE PEN SHOW,” which will earn you weird looks because.”


fiction writing tipsRinelle Grey presents 10 Tips for Preparing for NaNoWriMo posted at Rinelle Grey, saying, “I’ve seen quite a few of these “preparing” for NaNoWriMo posts around lately. I’m loving reading everyone else’s suggestions, so I thought I’d write some of my own.”


fiction writing tipsKristen Lamb presents NaNoWriMo—Training Lean, Mean, Writing Machines posted at Kristen Lamb’s Blog, saying, “NaNo is a lot like a military bootcamp. Many who sign up for military service aren’t in the fittest condition. Sure, we might meet the weight requirements (or get a waiver), but most of us don’t start out being able to knock out a hundred pushups on the spot. We likely have little experience running ten miles with a heavy pack of gear on our backs.”


Fiction Writing Tips Blog CarnivalThis concludes this edition of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. I want to thank all the contributors and invite them to submit more in the future.

If you enjoyed these articles, please leave some comments on the authors’ blogs and on this blog.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival, to be published on November 30, 2013 using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

read more

Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival Issue #6

Welcome to the Issue #6 of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. For those of you not familiar with what a Blog Carnival is, here is a short description: a collection of links pointing to blog posts around a specific topic. As you may have guessed it, this blog carnival will be centered around the subject of fiction writing, with a special interest for fantasy and science fiction.

Previous issues: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5

Enjoy!

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsChrys Fey presents Protagonist vs Antagonist posted at Write With Fey, saying, “A protagonist is the main character in a novel or story that all the action revolves around. They are the hero of the story, the one we are rooting for from beginning to end… An antagonist is a person who opposes, competes with, and fights against the main character in a novel. They are the villain of the story, the one we are hoping will fall to their demise.”


fiction writing tipsVictoria Grefer presents 5 Ways to Share a Point of View That Contrasts With Your Protagonist’s posted at Creative Writing with the Crimson League, saying, “How important is it, when writing, to provide multiple points of view and multiple sides of the story? This is something all authors ask themselves, and it’s an important question without a clear cut answer.”


fiction writing tipsElizabeth S. Craig presents When Your Work in Progress Needs Early Revisions posted at Mystery Writing Is Murder, saying, “As I mentioned last week, I recently turned in a teaser chapter and an outline to one of my Penguin editors. This particular editor likes to see an outline before a book is written.”


fiction writing tipsDebra Eve presents How to Create a Three-Phase Writing Ritual posted at Write It Sideways, saying, “Literature abounds with the quirky things writers do to entice the muse. […] If you’re having trouble putting the seat of your pants to the seat of the chair, a writing ritual might hold the answer.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsGeoff Hughes presents Stop making excuses. 6 ways to get your writing on track posted at The Write Stuff Blog, saying, “Stop making excuses. 6 ways to get your writing on track”


fiction writing tipsJessica S presents Good Writers Borrow, Great Writers Steal posted at The Write Shadow, saying, “How do you know what to publish and what to keep to yourself?”


fiction writing tipsPaul Draker presents How To Get Great Amazon Reviews For Your Brand-New Novel posted at A Newbie’s Guide to Publishing, saying, “If you’re reading this, maybe you’re a newbie writer like me. A story idea sinks its hooks into your brain and won’t let go. You find yourself grinning into an open refrigerator, whatever you were going to grab forgotten as the perfect plot twist or high-concept hook reveals itself to you. Your spouse/kid/significant-other has to repeat themselves three times before you realize you’re still standing there with frost forming on you’re face. And still grinning like an idiot.”


fiction writing tipsDave Navarro presents 7 Can’t-Miss Ways To Kick-Start The Writing Habit posted at Freelance Folder, saying, “Blogging can bring your business exposure, credibility, and whole lot more revenue – so it’s in your best interest to deliver a steady stream of powerful writing. But for a lot of us, that’s a tall order. If you’re finding your creative juices running a little dry, this list of quick and easy tips is sure to get them flowing again.”


fiction writing tipsLarry Brooks presents The Writing Tip That Changed My Life posted at Storyfix, saying, “As I sit here and pound on my new ebook, “101 Slightly Unpredictable Tips for Novelists and Screenwriters,” there’s one tip that haunts me, and has for the last three decades (yeah, I’m that old). It was a milestone and a perspective that changed everything, and a reminder that sometimes the little things we offer to others can make a profound difference in their lives.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsBryan Chau presents Fair Use Or Abuse – Copyright Edition For Indie Authors posted at Success Pen Pal, saying, “indie author, self-publishing, copyright, fair use, infringement, success, strategies, eBooks, etc.”


fiction writing tipsKimberley Grabas presents 34 Strategic Ways You Can Use Pinterest to Market Your Book and Your Author Brand posted at Your Writer Platform, saying, “Pinterest is exploding! And with it, so too are the opportunities for authors to expand their reach and increase their book promotion and brand awareness. Now the third largest social network, Pinterest acts as a virtual pin board that helps you organize and share things you find on the web. As you surf, you can pin images from other sites onto Pinterest where others can re-pin those same images. People head to Pinterest to find solutions, get ideas and to be inspired. Plus pinners are buyers. Hmmm… So how do we encourage them to be book buyers–your book buyers?”


Fiction Writing Tips Blog CarnivalThis concludes this edition of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. I want to thank all the contributors and invite them to submit more in the future.

If you enjoyed these articles, please leave some comments on the authors’ blogs and on this blog.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival, to be published on October 31, 2013 using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

read more

Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival Issue #5

Welcome to the Issue #5 of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. For those of you not familiar with what a Blog Carnival is, here is a short description: a collection of links pointing to blog posts around a specific topic. As you may have guessed it, this blog carnival will be centered around the subject of fiction writing, with a special interest for fantasy and science fiction.

Previous issues: #1 #2 #3 #4

Enjoy!

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsHazel L Longuet presents 6 Inspirational Writing Websites posted at A Novel Experience, saying, “6 of the best websites on writing, self-publishing and book promotion – invaluable advice on all aspects of writing”


fiction writing tipsAmanda @ Writing Cozy Mysteries presents Multi-Dimensional Characters: Why They’re Important and How You Create Them posted at Writing Cozy Mysteries.


fiction writing tipsK.M. Weiland presents 5 Ways to Write a Killer Plot Twist posted at Helping Writers Become Authors, saying, “I love plot twists. Mistaken identities, sneaky plans, sleight of hand—it’s all grand. Nothing makes me happier than a story that pulls the rug out from under me and shows me that my perception of the story up to that point is nowhere near as cool as the reality. But, by the same token, nothing annoys me more than a story that fools me and then laughs at me—or, worse, thinks it’s fooled me when, really, it’s only bored me.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsChrys Fey presents Creating Mood posted at Write With Fey, saying, “How a reader reacts to your writing emotionally all depends on the mood you convey. This post gives examples of what mood is and reveals how to create it.”


fiction writing tipsVictoria Grefer presents How do you come back to writing fiction after a long break? posted at Crimson League, saying, “What is it like as an author of fiction to come back after a substantial break from novel-writing?”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsHazel L Longuet presents 7 Ways to Fund Your Writing posted at A Novel Experience, saying, “7 easy ways to get funding for the writing, publishing and promotion of your book.”


fiction writing tipsKimberley Grabas presents Powerful Pictures Perform: How to Create Images That Grab Attention posted at Your Writer Platform, saying, “Images and graphics are an incredibly important tool for capturing your audience’s interest. Like multi-pixel eye-candy for your readers. For many writers, this may be alien territory, but since the importance of images in today’s world can not be denied–or ignored–finding simple but effective ways to source, edit and incorporate images into your platform building is essential.”


fiction writing tipsAli Luke presents How to Finish Your Novel (While Life Goes On) posted at Aliventures, saying, “Maybe you’ve been working on your novel for months, or even years. (Or maybe you’ve not started yet, because you’re waiting for a chunk of free time to come along.) Life is busy. You’d love to have all day, every day, to write, but of course you don’t. You have a day job or your own business or young kids or elderly parents or volunteering commitments or other hobbies or health issues … or quite probably a combination of several of those. The good news is that you can do it. You CAN produce a finished novel – without your fairy godmother waving a magic wand and granting you six months away from your regular life.
And here’s how I know…”


fiction writing tipsChristina Katz presents Take A Break & Refresh Your Writing Career posted at The Prosperous Writer, saying, “Writing career growth is a spiral, not a sprint. And if you don’t allow yourself some time for your fields to run fallow, if you are always a slave to your to-do list, your nervous system is not going to reset itself in preparation for more growth.”


fiction writing tipsLinda Formichelli presents Why You Shouldn’t Do What All The Other Writers Are Doing posted at The Renegade Writer, saying, “When you think of a professional writer, you probably envision someone who starts at the crack of dawn and guzzles coffee as he writes. So you force yourself to get up at 5 am because that’s what a “real writer” would do, and brew a pot of coffee even though you prefer hot cocoa or tea. Then you fall asleep in front of your computer as your untouched coffee grows cold, and when you wake up you feel like a failure.”


fiction writing tipsJeff Moore presents 24 Blogs with Tips for Promoting Creative Writing in Kids posted at Babysitting Jobs, saying, “Creative writing, on the other hand, can be frustrating when the ideas aren’t flowing. As a parent, it’s important to find ways to encourage your child’s creative writing skills, which you can do by giving him writing prompts or brainstorming with him.”


Fiction Writing Tips Blog CarnivalThis concludes this edition of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. I want to thank all the contributors and invite them to submit more in the future.

If you enjoyed these articles, please leave some comments on the authors’ blogs and on this blog.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival, to be published on August 31, 2013 using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

read more

Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival Issue #5

Welcome to the Issue #5 of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. For those of you not familiar with what a Blog Carnival is, here is a short description: a collection of links pointing to blog posts around a specific topic. As you may have guessed it, this blog carnival will be centered around the subject of fiction writing, with a special interest for fantasy and science fiction.

You may have noticed a slight delay on this issue and I apologize for that, but I’ve been away visiting my old native grounds. Now I’m back and the world is back to normal as well.

Previous issues: #1 #2 #3 #4

Enjoy!

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsChrys Fey presents How To Write Romance posted at Write With Fey, saying, “This post contains ten tips and you don’t have to be a romance novelist to use them! Romance is so versatile that it can be used for any genre of fiction, and by every writer.”


fiction writing tipsLauren Sapala presents Why You Can’t Finish Your Novel posted at Lauren Sapala, saying, “Sometimes we get sidetracked from our current writing project. A life crisis occurs, we get a promotion at our day job that includes more hours to be worked, or we get an idea for a new project that’s just begging to be written right now. These are all valid reasons for putting your novel on the shelf and planning to come back to it later.”


fiction writing tipsDavid Leonhardt presents How to write the plot of a story posted at A Ghost Writers Blog, saying, “Here is a generic plot summary (with Infographic) that you can use as a base for your own fiction or other story-type manuscript.”


fiction writing tipsLauren Sapala presents Want to Be a Better Writer? Watch More Movies. posted at Lauren Sapala, saying, “This article shows writers how to hone their character development skills by taking a closer look at stars of the the silver screen.”

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsKimberley Grabas presents How to Market a Book and Strengthen Your Author Platform with Goodreads posted at Your Writer Platform, saying, “Imagine a magical place that gathers together 17 million of the most passionate readers who want to talk about, review and buy your book. A place that not only allows, but encourages, both new and established authors to promote their books. A place that provides FREE opportunities to:

  • get your book in front of thousands of buyers
  • conduct informal research (polls)
  • participate in a highly viral environment
  • join or create groups with like-minded people on every literary topic imaginable
  • create an author presence, connecting your book, your blog and your social media platforms

Now imagine if Amazon purchased this magical realm of high quality, book-buying, book-loving influencers in the spring of 2013, likely leading to big opportunities to align your Amazon marketing to this Utopia.
If such a paradise existed, would you want to be a part of it?”


fiction writing tipsKerin Gedge presents The Vocabuverse: The Cleverly Devised Poetical Dictionary of Mostly English Words by Kerin Gedge posted at The Vocabuverse, saying, “Here’s a helpful tool for writers who want to expand their vocabulary…”


fiction writing tips

Kimberley Grabas presents 101 Quick Actions You Can Take Today to Build the Writer Platform of Your Dreams posted at Your Writer Platform, saying, “What does it really take to build a writer or author platform?Money?Connections?An intimate knowledge of vampires, wizardry or erotic romance?Actually, the most important aspect to building an author platform is understanding that it’s about engagement; about connecting and interacting with people who are aligned with your message and affected by your story. Your platform is a web of intertwined beliefs, values, emotions, thoughts, stories, images and ideas that stem from your own core philosophy and are ultimately shared by your fans.
The tricky part is finding ways to effectively share your message with an audience that is yet unknown to you, and you to them. Establishing and maintaining a link to your potential ‘tribe’ is both the challenge and the reward of building your writer platform.”

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsIsabella Harriss presents 28 Blogs Featuring Original Short Stories You Can Read for Free posted at Nanny News Network, saying, “You can find tons of free short stories online in every genre, ranging from romance to fantasy to sci-fi .you can also find free kid’s stories online for every age group.”


fiction writing tipsDavid Leonhardt presents You might be a writer posted at A Ghost Writers Blog, saying, “”If you ask your child whether the new kid in school is the protagonist or the antagonist, you might be a writer.” … and dozens more clues that might implicate you in this writing conspiracy.”


fiction writing tipsAngela Greenfield presents Borrowing Plots posted at BecomingAWriterBlog.com, saying, “This post is about considerations that writers must think about when borrowing plots from older works.”


Fiction Writing Tips Blog CarnivalThis concludes this edition of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. I want to thank all the contributors and invite them to submit more in the future.

If you enjoyed these articles, please leave some comments on the authors’ blogs and on this blog.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival, to be published on July 31, 2013 using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

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Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival Issue #4

Welcome to the Issue #4 of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. For those of you not familiar with what a Blog Carnival is, here is a short description: a collection of links pointing to blog posts around a specific topic. As you may have guessed it, this blog carnival will be centered around the subject of fiction writing, with a special interest for fantasy and science fiction.

Previous issues: #1 #2 #3

Enjoy!

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsDavid Leonhardt presents Wreck-It Ralph and Character Jobs, Part I posted at A Ghost Writers Blog, saying, “It is hard to separate people from their jobs, because one of the first questions we ask is, “What do you do?” Why would your characters, including in nonfiction, be any different?”


fiction writing tipsChrys Fey presents How To Write Action posted at Write With Fey, saying, “Every writer has tips that help them write, rules they follow, and methods they use. This link will lead you to the TEN TIPS that I find helpful when I am writing ACTION.”


fiction writing tipsJon Rhodes presents Scriptwriting a Movie in a Month posted at Film Script Writing, saying, “Here is a great plan to help you write a movie script in just one month.”

fiction writing tips

Robb Grindstaff presents Bring Your Fiction To Life With Emotion posted at Novel Publicity & Co., saying, “There are lots of ways that writers slip into ‘telling’ (external) rather than ‘showing’ (internal), especially when it comes to emotion.”


fiction writing tips

Mark Nichol presents 7 Cases for Inserting or Omitting Commas posted at Daily Writing Tips, saying, “Here are discussions of seven types of situations in which the presence or absence of a comma depends on various factors.”

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tips

Janice Gable Bashman & Kathryn Craft presents The 7 Deadly Sins of Self-Editing posted at Writer’s Digest, saying, “We’re most likely to sin when we’re at our most vulnerable—and for creative writers, there may be no more vulnerable time than the delicate (and often excruciating) process of editing our own work. Sidestep these too-common traps, and keep your story’s soul pure.”


fiction writing tips

Stephanie Orges presents 20 Tips For Creating Relatable And Lovable Protagonists posted at be kind, Rewrite, saying, “Keep them reading. That’s our mission, right? And there’s nothing that can hook any reader faster and stronger than a protagonist they can relate to, like, and therefore care about. This is one half of the D in AIDA (Attention, Interest, Desire, Action).”


fiction writing tips

K.M. Weiland presents 10 Ways to Write Skinny Sentences posted at WordPlay, saying, “If brevity is the soul of wit, then economy is the energy of prose. Don’t get me wrong: I love complex, twisty, beautiful sentences[…] However, the possibilities of prose will never be realized so long as it is burdened with unnecessary fat. Learn to trim your sentences into lean, mean bundles of incisive power, and their inherent beauty and complexity will run laps around their former flabbiness.”


fiction writing tips

Victoria Grefer presents When ‘To Be’ Becomes An Enemy posted at Creative Writing with the Crimson League, saying, “‘To be’: it’s an essential verb. It’s the focus of one of Shakespeare’s most famous soliloquies. And yet, one of the major tips we writers are always hearing is, ‘cut ‘to be.’ It makes for weak and passive writing.'”


fiction writing tips

Alex Shvartsman presents 5 Practical Tips on Writing Humor posted at DArkcargo, saying, “In my quest to make everyone write funny stories I would enjoy, I have identified five practical strategies to writing humor in a speculative story, which I am now going to share with you. It may not necessarily be good advice, but I’ll make up for that in volume.”

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsKimberley Grabas presents 11 Author Website Must Have Elements posted at Your Writer Platform, saying, “An author website has a lofty goal: it needs to not just be, but also needs to perform and respond. No longer just a fancy, static, online business card, it is an author’s ‘homebase‘, a marketing and networking hub and a portal that allows communication to flow between an author and his or her readers. And website visits can translate directly into books sold…”


fiction writing tipsJessica Clark presents The Big List of Different Types of Poems posted at Kenney Myers, saying, “There’s definitely more to poetry than the rhyming sentiments in greeting cards, though many of those verses do adhere to one of these style forms.”


Fiction Writing Tips Blog CarnivalThis concludes this edition of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. I want to thank all the contributors and invite them to submit more in the future.

If you enjoyed these articles, please leave some comments on the authors’ blogs and on this blog.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival, to be published on May 31, 2013 using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

read more

Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival Issue #3

Welcome to the Issue #3 of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. For those of you not familiar with what a Blog Carnival is, here is a short description: a collection of links pointing to blog posts around a specific topic. As you may have guessed it, this blog carnival will be centered around the subject of fiction writing, with a special interest for fantasy and science fiction.

Previous issues: #1 #2

Enjoy!

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsChrys Fey presents Bring Characters To Life! posted at Write With Fey, saying, “Characters are the most important aspect in a novel so a writer has to bring them to life! This post will give you tips on just how to do that.”


fiction writing tips Melissa Donovan presents 42 Fiction Writing Tips for Novelists posted at Writing Forward, saying, “The more I explore fiction writing, the more complex and multi-layered it becomes. Through the processes of brainstorming, outlining, researching, writing, and revising, I have discovered countless details that authors have to consider as they set out to produce a viable work of fiction.”


fiction writing tipsBlair McDowel presents How to write a character study? posted at Vanessa Morgan, saying “I always begin any new book by choosing a setting I know and love, and then by creating the characters I want to put in that setting. Only after that do I start thinking about the plot. Then I write a synopsis for that plot before I write page one of the book. Any of these three things, setting, characters, or plot, can change as my story grows, but I have a very complete plan before I start any new novel.”


fiction writing tipsMark Nichol presents When to Use “That,” “Which,” and “Who” posted at Daily Writing Tips, saying “The proper use of the relative pronouns who, that, and which relate the subject of a sentence to its object, hence the name. The question of which of the three words to use in a given context vexes some writers; here’s an explanation of their relative roles.”


fiction writing tips C.S. Lakin presents The Secret to Show, Don’t Tell posted at Wordplay, saying, “Gone are the days of the long narrative passages we used to see in novels written by greats like Dickens and Steinbeck. Even though literary prose is still highly praised and found in many bestselling commercial novels, the trend over the last few decades has been to “show, not tell.” Meaning, readers prefer scenes in which they are watching the action unfold in real time—instead of being told what is happening by the author or even by one of the characters.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsDavid Leonhardt presents What makes a good book? posted at A Ghost Writers Blog, saying, “One of the questions we get frequently goes something like this: “Do you think I have a good enough story? Do you think it’s a best seller?” This gives us a moment to consider what makes a successful book, so I would like to share my thoughts on this with you.”


fiction writing tipsGabriela Pereira presents What To Do When You Have Writer’s Block posted at DIY MFA, saying, “Every so often, writers hit a road block. Sometimes we’re zipping along that writing highway and suddenly we take a detour and we’re off on a side road and boom! We run into a herd of cattle hanging out in the middle of our path. Sure, we could off-road it and drive through the pastures to avoid that stretch of road, but usually when we writers run into these blocks we do what anyone would do.”


fiction writing tipsMarti MacGibbon presents Seven Tips for Being a Better Writer posted at Writers and Authors, saying, “Writing is something we all do, every day of our lives. We compose emails, social media posts, write heartfelt letters to friends and family or crisp missives to business associates. Some people are gifted wordsmiths, delighting everyone with their talent, and yet they don’t think of themselves as possessing any special writing skills.”


fiction writing tipsDavid Leonhardt presents Are You Ready for a Ghostwriter for Your Book? posted at A Ghost Writers Blog, saying, “The more you have prepared in advance, the lower the cost will be for you. Ideally, the writer does not have to do any outside research, because you have done it all. If you provide your information in a complete and organized fashion, it saves time and money.”


fiction writing tipsJessica Clark presents 10 Reasons Every Poem Should Rhyme and How it Could Impact You BIG Time posted at Kenney Myers, saying, “While Ezra Pound is largely credited with starting the free verse poetry movement that created more relaxed style requirements and eliminated the wide-spread use of formal poetry, there are still plenty of aficionados out there who firmly believe that all poetry should rhyme.”


Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsJen & Kerry presents How Your Book’s Format Can Bolster Sales posted at The Business Of Books, saying, “How do you physically envision your book? Do you see your novel as a jacketed 6×9-inch hardcover with a $24.95 price point? Are you writing a romance that you can see as a mass market paperback that someone can tuck in their purse or read on the beach?”


Fiction Writing Tips Blog CarnivalThis concludes this edition of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. I want to thank all the contributors and invite them to submit more in the future.

If you enjoyed these articles, please leave some comments on the authors’ blogs and on this blog.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival, to be published on March 31, 2013 using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

read more

Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival Issue #2

Welcome to the Issue #2 of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. For those of you not familiar with what a Blog Carnival is, here is a short description: a collection of links pointing to blog posts around a specific topic. As you may have guessed it, this blog carnival will be centered around the subject of fiction writing, with a special interest for fantasy and science fiction.

Previous issues: #1

Enjoy!

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tips Kelly Kilpatrick presents 10 Tips to Improve Your Fiction Writing Skills posted at Writing Forward, saying, “Writing fiction, whether short or long, can be a very trying experience indeed. So many writers of fiction have different processes for achieving their writing goals that it’s hard to sift through what works and what doesn’t.”


fiction writing tips C.S. Laikin presents The Secret to Show, Don’t Tell posted at Wordplay, saying, “Gone are the days of the long narrative passages we used to see in novels written by greats like Dickens and Steinbeck. Even though literary prose is still highly praised and found in many bestselling commercial novels, the trend over the last few decades has been to “show, not tell.” Meaning, readers prefer scenes in which they are watching the action unfold in real time—instead of being told what is happening by the author or even by one of the characters.”

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tips Marisa Wikramanayake presents How to write a book: Part 1: Introduction posted at Marisa Wikramanayake. This is a series of 13 different tutorials that Maria wrote on the craft of fiction writing. She is a freelance journalist and editor and her blog is a goud resource for writers. I suggest you go through all her 13 chapters.


fiction writing tipsDavid Leonhardt presents Before you sign a Ghostwriter contract posted at A Ghost Writers Blog, saying, “You have found a ghostwriter that you want to work with. You are ready to sign a contract. But does the contract cover everything? Here is a quick guide to what you need to know…”


fiction writing tipsJoanna Penn presents How to Write More and Create a Daily Writing Habit posted at The Creative Penn, saying, “One of the best ways to sell more books, is to have more product available. For this, you need to write more word count. Here’s how one author is doing it in 2013.”

Fantasy Fiction General Writing

fiction writing tipsSamir Bharadwaj presents Evolving Your Writing Voice posted at Samir Bharadwaj dot Com, saying, “Reading inspires you but you also end up absorbing the writing habits of the writers you admire. Here are some tips to help you develop your own unique voice.”


fiction writing tipsChrys Fey presents Get Ready, Set, TONE! posted at Write with Fey, saying, “Revisions are a vital step of writing. Do you know what to look for?”


fiction writing tipsSamir Bharadwaj presents Clear-headed Writing posted at Samir Bharadwaj dot Com. Samir is so nice, I had to include him twice! This is a good post where Samir gives us practical advice on how to clear your mind before you start writing and how it can be beneficial to your writing career.


fiction writing tipsSydney Bell presents 35 Blogs for Those that Aspire to Become Writers posted at Longhorn Leads, LLC, saying, “Do you want to become a writer but you don’t know where to start. First and foremost, you need to write something, even if it’s just a journal or a blog. That way, you can get the creative juices flowing.”


Fiction Writing Tips Blog CarnivalThis concludes this edition of the Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival. I want to thank all the contributors and invite them to submit more in the future.

If you enjoyed these articles, please leave some comments on the authors’ blogs and on this blog.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Fiction Writing Tips Blog Carnival, to be published on March 31, 2013 using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

read more